Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Questions About the Blogging Community

I gave a presentation about blogging at my church this past Sunday. Some questions arose so am throwing them out to the blogging community to respond. Thanks.

How does the blogging community (responders, etc.) compare to other forms of community you experience?

Is your sense of electronic connectedness deeper and more fulfilling?

How does it compare to generating connectedness at church or "going out with friends?"

Could it be that serious bloggers are truly redefining "community?"

2 comments:

Tammy said...

Blogging is more supportive than my community. No one really talks to each other anymore. Neighbors keep to themselves and church sticks to faith. Clubs are about one thing. Blogging has variety.

Blogging allows you to easily find people with the same likes and people share on deeper levels.

Fellowship is wonderful but limited to a shared faith. When I go out with friends we catch up on our lives and laugh. Not much sharing of fears and pain.

I have developed my closest friendship ever online. She has ALS and blogging with her keeps me going. My "live" friends don't know my deepest feelings that I share in my poetry. They don't even like poetry or care enough to read my blog. Some look down on it, or cut me slack because I'm homebound.

Being disabled, blogging has made me feel part of society and given me a better outlook for my future.

Crafty Green Poet said...

Blogging for me is a great way of forming communities of interest. I find that blogging poets are less elitist than non-blogging poets, or less so than the 'literary world' anyway. I have some very close friends in real life who do understand poetry and creativity but certainly compared to work communities or church communities I have known, blogging offers more. Our area of Edinburgh is developing coimmunity gardening projects at the moment, this may lead to close knit local community networks in the future, but currently although I like my neighbourhood, it doesn't feel like a community.